Category Archives: ESD Shielding

Third Party Testing Proves Protektive Pak’s Impregnated Corrugated Material is Superior

Protektive Pak’s Dissipative Impregnated Corrugated material features a unique characteristic, a buried shielding layer. This provides a better value because unlike dissipative or conductive painted material, the buried shielding layer will not rub/scratch off or lose its ESD properties. This translates into a superior, longer lasting ESD safe package.

Third party testing has been performed on Protektive Pak’s Impregnated Corrugated material demonstrating that the buried shielding layer in our corrugated material provides a better value than dissipative or conductive coated (or painted) material.

 Proven…

  • Protektive Pak impregnated corrugated material has a buried shielding layer
  • Protektive Pak impregnated corrugated material equals or exceeds the discharge shielding capabilities of a coated box
  • Protektive Pak impregnated corrugated material has discharge shielding capabilities equal to a metal-out shielding bag
  •  Protektive Pak Dissipative Corrugated Material meets the ANSI/ESD S541 recommendation, avoiding rapid discharge when contacting ESD sensitive items –
    conductive coated boxes DO NOT!

Protektive Pak Dissipative Impregnated Corrugated Material meets ANSI/ESD S20.20 and Packaging standard ANSI/ESD S541 tested per ANSI/ESD STM11.11 and modified ANSI/ESD STM11.31

For complete third party test results, click HERE.

Watch our Material Test video:

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How to Properly Use An ESD Shielding Bag

A basic principle of ESD control in a manufacturing environment is that ESD susceptible items should only be removed from ESD protective packaging when they are in an ESD protected area (EPA). Most EPAs are made up of “Islands” of control; the packaging / materials handling system must provide proper protection for ESD susceptible items during transport and storage outside those “islands” of control. When moving ESD susceptible items outside an EPA, it is necessary for the product to be packaged in closed ESD Shielding Packaging.

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Tip# 1 – Not a Worksurface

Do not use a shielding bag as an ESD worksurface. Although a shielding bag is safe to use around ESD susceptible products, it is not intended to be a worksurface for product. It should be set aside or discarded after removing the product from the bag.

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Tip# 2 – No Potholders or Tacos

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Do not use a shielding bag as an “ESD potholder” or “ESD taco.” This type of use offers no ESD protection to the product.

Tip# 3 – Enclose Product

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Shielding bags should be large enough to enclose the entire product and closed with a label or zipper style bag. 

Tip# 4 – Remove Charges

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Place closed bag on an ESD worksurface before removing product to remove any charge that might have accumulated on the surface of the bag.

Tip# 5 – Don’t Over-Use

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Re‐using shielding bags is acceptable so long as there is no damage to the shielding layer. Bags with holes, tears, or excessive wrinkles should be discarded.

So, are you using your ESD bags correctly?

If you have questions regarding shielding bags or ESD control, please click HERE.

Click for more information on Metal-In Shielding Bags.

 

Why Use ESD Shielding vs Non-Shielding Containers

ShieldingVsNonShieldingElectroStatic Discharge (ESD) is silent, quick and potentially lethal to electronic parts. When electronic parts are not properly handled during manufacturing, assembly, storage, or shipping, damage from ESD can reach into the millions of dollars each year.

For an ESD control container to be effective against ElectroStatic Discharge, it must possess certain electrical characteristics:

  • Surface resistance <1 x 1011 ohms per ANSI/ESD STM11.11
  • Energy penetration <50 nanoJoules per ANSI/ESD STM11.31

Non-shielding containers might be cheaper, but they are not less costly when it comes to handling ESD sensitive items. Anytime ESD sensitive parts and assemblies are handled, regular containers are not a sound option, even part of the time, as the risk of ESD damage is always lingering. As a result, costs will be incurred, either via ESD damage or as an additional investment in discharge shielding packaging and material handling containers.

The disadvantages of cross-using shielding and non-shielding containers include:

  • Increased cost
  • Risk from ESD damage
  • Handling inconvenience

The cost of a discharge shielding container is far less than the cost associated with damaged parts or extra handling that result with a “less expensive” non-shielding container.